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7. CHARLES G. "CHINESE" GORDON (1833-1885)
British General, suppressed the Taiping Rebellion in China. Killed by forces of the Mahdi in the fall of Khartoum, thereby becoming a revered Victorian martyr. Signed pencil notation beside a clipped article concerning the slave trade. Responding to a notation in another hand questioning Gordon’s estimate of 50,000 slaves annually going through North Africa, Gordon writes "I consider this quite true. C. Gordon." $435.00 SOLD

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8. ERWIN JOLLASSE (1892-1987)
Winner of the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves. German Lieutenant-General in the Second World War, commanded the 344th Infantry Division and the 9th Panzer Division. In the last weeks of the war, he commanded a group named "Combat Team Jollasse," comprised of the remains of the 344th Infantry Division and the 10th Waffen SS Division "Frundsberg." Signed letter, in German, to a collector mentioning a signed photograph (not included) and wishing him luck with his collection. Dated November 3, 1986, and signed "E. Jolasse." $165.00

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9. ERNST KÖNIG
German Major-General during World War Two, one of the few to win the Knight’s Cross with Oakleaves. At the age of 36 he was commanding the 28th Jäger-Division on the Eastern Front. Typed letter on the stationery of the Organization of Knight’s Cross Holders, giving information on himself and the organization. Signed by König, and accompanied with a summary of his service record. $80.00

10. HENRY KNOX (1750-1806)
Bookseller turned Soldier of the Revolution. Skilled and respected artillery general during the War of the Revolution, ultimately becoming the chief artillery officer for the army. Friend and confidante of George Washington. First United States Secretary of War 1785-1794. Manuscript War Department letter dated May 30, 1793, authorizing "all the brass mounted muskets put into order." Large, bold signature "H. Knox" as Secretary of War. $725.00


11. HUDSON LOWE (1770-1844)
British General, Napoleon's jailer on the island of St. Helena during the time that the former emperor was exiled there, from 1815 until his death in 1821. Lowe was a target of the exiled Napoleon's spite, and is sometimes implicated in conspiracy theories surrounding the Emperor's death. Partially printed pay master's certificate dated April 24, 1805, and signed twice by Lowe "H. Lowe Lt. Col. Comm." as commanding officer at Malta. $695.00 SOLD

12. HUDSON LOWE (1770-1844)
British General, Napoleon's jailer on the island of St. Helena during the time that the former emperor was exiled there, from 1815 until his death in 1821. Lowe was a target of the exiled Napoleon's spite, and is sometimes implicated in conspiracy theories surrounding the Emperor's death. Signature clipped from a document, "Hudson Lowe." $125.00

13. NELSON A. MILES (1839-1925)
Union Major-General, winning the Congressional Medal of Honor for action at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Commanded US Army 1895-1901, retired as a Lieutenant-General. Successful Indian fighter, he fought the Nez Perce 1877 and the Apaches under Geronimo 1886. Organized and trained troops for the Spanish-American War 1898. Typed letter dated August 29, 1890, recommending a US Army lieutenant for brevet rank under an Act of Congress to reward "gallant services in Indian campaigns." Excellent content as Miles recounts the lieutenant's conspicuous gallantry in action against the Nez Perce and later the Apache war against Geronimo's band. Signed in pencil "N. A. Miles, MG" as major-general commanding the Division of the Pacific. On very thin paper with some age discoloration, and a few spots of paper loss. Archivally de-acidified and backed. Scarce, with very good content. $1200.00
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14. NELSON A. MILES (1839-1925)
Union Major-General, winning the Congressional Medal of Honor for action at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Commanded US Army 1895-1901, retired as a Lieutenant-General. Successful Indian fighter, he fought the Nez Perce 1877 and the Apaches under Geronimo 1886. Organized and trained troops for the Spanish-American War 1898. Very nice manuscript letter on Headquarters Division of the Pacific stationery, dated November 23, 1889. Addressed to General HENRY L. ABBOTT (1831-1927), an engineer officer who had commanded the Union siege artillery at Petersburg. Although only a colonel in the regular army, Miles addressed him by the brevet rank of major-general of volunteers awarded for his Civil War service. The letter concerns a visit by Abbott and his attendance at an event hosted by Miles. Fine condition, boldly signed "Nelson A. Miles." $285.00

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15. NAPOLEON (1769-1821)
One of the greatest military geniuses of the modern era. He was born a younger son of an obscure Corsican lawyer, yet rose, thanks to his abilities and the opportunities of the French Revolution, to become Napoleon I, Emperor of the French. 2x Page manuscript letter in French to the Duc de Feltre, dated March 31, 1813. Henri Jacques Clarke, Duc de Feltre, was Napoleon’s highly competent Minister of War. The Emperor is requesting Clarke’s help in raising four new regiments, totaling over 21,000 men, from amongst the marine artillery, and gives instructions regarding their distribution to the army. An important and fascinating item, showing as it does the desperate, creative measures the Emperor was taking to ease the manpower crisis in his armies. By this point in time Napoleon was at war with virtually all of Europe, had lost a huge army in Russia the previous year, and the allies were pressing in on France. Signed "Np" as Emperor. $2450.00 SOLD

Military and Naval History
16. OLIVER HAZARD PERRY (1785-1819)
Distinguished US Navy officer, one of the heroes of the early American naval tradition, brother of Matthew C. Perry. Veteran of the Quasi-War with France, victor of the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. Fantastic letter entirely in Perry's own hand, addressed to Commander WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE (1774-1833). US Navy Officer, one of the first heroes of the American naval tradition. He saw active service in the Quasi-War with France and the wars with the Barbary States. Succeeded Isaac Hull in command of the famed US Frigate Constitution, "Old Ironsides," during the War of 1812. The letter hints at naval intrigue and political maneuvering, and mentions several of the top officers of the day. Dated September 20, 1807, and signed "O. H. Perry." A rare item from one of the legends of the early US Navy. $3900.00

17. TIMOTHY PICKERING (1745-1829)
Patriot activist, served as member of the Board of War and Quartermaster-General of the Army during the War of the Revolution. Appointed Secretary of War 1795, he served until dismissed by political enemy John Adams in 1800. An ardent Federalist, he opposed the war of 1812. Original manuscript document dated June 19, 1784, at West Point, where John Burges has been paid 92 days extra pay for his services as an artificer, as the last of the Massachusetts Regiments to remain at West Point. Burges was part of the tiny caretaker force that remained when the Continental Army was disbanded following the Revolutionary War. The American army would eventually just number a few hundred men once most of the remainder, like Burges, mustered out. A great Revolutionary artifact, signed by Pickering as Quartermaster General. $490.00

18. JOHN RODGERS (1771-1838)
Senior naval officer in the U.S. Navy who served under six Presidents for nearly four decades. He served aboard the Constellation and commanded both the Insurgente and and the Maryland. His service included the Barbary Wars and the War of 1812. Serving in the Navy during its formative years, he became a senior officer and helped to develop the practices and traditions that emerged. Rodgers was noted for commanding the largest American squadron to sail the Mediterranean Sea. He also commanded the USS John Adams which was the flagship of the fleet that would defeat the Barbary states of North Africa. It was during the War of 1812 where Rodgers, serving as a ranking officer, fired the first shot aboard the USS President and played a leading role in the recapture of Washington DC after it was burned by the British.

This letter is handwritten and signed by Rodgers. Dated April 13, 1831, it is a letter of the Navy Commission Office directing the replacement of the tin roof of the Ship House over the Pennsylvania which had been blown off by a gale of wind. Included with the letter is the postal cover, with the free frank signature of Rodgers, directed to the Commanding Officer, Navy Yard, Philadelphia. $475.00

21. (WAR OF 1812)
Original letter addressed to Colonel Robert Pogue, commanding the 4th Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers. The author, William Shotwell, encloses newspapers with an "account of the Battle of Queenstown, the President's message, and many other things." He mentions seeing Mrs. Pogue, from whom he bought some oxen, and assures the colonel that his family is well. Dated November 18, 1812. Some tape repairs to missing sections of paper. No postal markings on the integral address leaf, so this was carried and delivered privately. A great piece of early Americana from a war that left relatively few paper documents. $195.00

22. (WAR OF 1812)
Spectacular six-page handwritten letter from ROBERT TROUP (1757-1832), Soldier of the Revolution, Aide to General Gates, roommate and close personal friend of Alexander Hamilton. He spent time as a Prisoner of War aboard the Infamous Prison Ship "Jersey." Fantastic content in this letter written to GENERAL STEPHEN van RENSSELLEAR, as Major General of the New York Militia he presided over the botched invasion of Canada. Packed with military news and opinions, as well as political commentary (Troup was a partisan Federalist, and at one point opines that "the southern and Eastern folks are hot as pepper for Clinton.") He makes mention of the poor condition of much of the new forts and guns, and Rensselear's Niagara situation. An excellent War of 1812 souvenir, with strong content from an influential and opinionated Federalist. Dated October 17, 1812 at New York, and signed "Robt. Troup." What Troup probably did not yet know, was that Rensellear's ill-fated invasion of Canada had begun three days earlier. $450.00 SOLD

23. UNITED STATES NAVAL LYCEUM MEMBERSHIP DIPLOMA (1836)
On November 28, 1833, a group of U.S. Navy and Marine Corps officers, including Captain Matthew Perry and Commodore Charles G. Ridgely, founded the United States Naval Lyceum at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Organized to "promote the diffusion of useful knowledge, to foster a spirit of harmony and a community of interest in the service, and to cement the links which unite us [Navy and Marine Corps officers] as professional brethren," the Lyceum consisted of a library, a museum, and for a brief time boasted its own journal, Naval Magazine. Additionally, members of the Naval Lyceum were among the leading voices in favor of the establishment of a formal naval academy.

Fifty-five years after its founding, the United States Naval Lyceum was disbanded. After ceasing operations, the Lyceum's collections were transferred to the United States Naval Academy where they became the core of the Naval Academy Museum's collection.

Measuring 15" x 18" this United States Naval Officers Membership diploma of the United States Naval Lyceum is issued by the Navy Yard, New York and dated December 29, 1836. It contains the signatures of:

Charles Goodwin Ridgely (1794-1848,) President: Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Ridgely served with Edward Preble during the First Barbary War. He was promoted to captain and placed in command of Erie. He commanded the Brazil Station and saw campaigns against the West Indian Pirates.

Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858,) 1st Vice President: The brother of Oliver H. Perry and serving as Commodore of the U.S. Navy, Perry commanded a number of ships. He served in the Mexican-American War and the War of 1812. Perry aided in setting the first course of instruction at Annapolis and organized the naval engineer corps. With the advent of the steam engine, he was a leading advocate in the modernization of the US Navy and was dubbed "The Father of the Steam Navy."

Tunis Cravin (1813-1864,) 2nd Vice President: Cravin served in the Mexican-American War and the Civil War. He was an officer in the US Navy and a leading surveyor and hydrographer of the navy. During the Civil War he commanded the ironclad Tecumseh, 1863-1864, and went down with her in Mobile Bay.

$3500.00

24. WORLD WAR II PHILADELPHIA NAVY YARD
Ship Launching Announcement. Beautiful and very rare original announcement of an unusual triple wartime launch from the Philadelphia Navy Yard two cruiser, the USS Chicago and USS Los Angeles, as well as the USS Antietam on August 20, 1944! Nice engraved announcement and admission pass enclosed in original cover with engraved vignette, original Navy Yard postmark and wartime stamp. A great World War Two naval souvenir. $100.00
1. WILLIAM BAINBRIDGE (1774-1883)
US Navy Officer, one of the first heroes of the American naval tradition. He saw active service in the Quasi-War with France and the wars with the Barbary States. Succeeded Isaac Hull in command of the famed US Frigate Constitution, "Old Ironsides," during the War of 1812. Splendid 4-page manuscript letter dated October 26, 1822, addressed to JAMES BIDDLE (1783-1848), a veteran naval officer and hero of the War of 1812. In 1822, Biddle was captain of the US Frigate "Congress."

The letter, comprising over 700 words, contains sensitive and detailed advice for Biddle on his strained relations with two brother officers, and mentions many of the best-known US Navy officers and vessels. A rare and intriguing glimpse inside the early American Navy. Written in Bainbridge's hand and signed "Wm. Bainbridge." A complete transcription of the letter is included. $1250.00

2. LOUIS-ALEXANDRE BERTHIER (1753-1815)
Prince of Neuchatel and Wagram, Marshal of France. A brilliant Chief of Staff, he served under Napoleon from 1796 to 1814. He refused to rejoin the Emperor when he returned from exile on Elba, and mysteriously fell to his death from a window at Bamberg. Manuscript letter to the Minister of War forwarding some correspondence from Spain. War-dated 1808. Boldly signed by Berthier. $275.00 SOLD

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3. HENRI J. G. CLARKE, DUC de FELTRE (1765-1818)
General and Minister of War under Napoleon, Marshal of France under the restored Bourbons. Manuscript letter dated May 16, 1807, addressed to a director of a cadet corps. Signed “Clarke” as Governor-General of Berlin, just three months before taking over as Minister of War. In French, not translated. $200.00

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4. HENRI J. G. CLARKE, DUC de FELTRE (1765-1818)
General and Minister of War under Napoleon, Marshal of France under the restored Bourbons. Partially printed official document from the Ministry of War conferring command of the Department of Aude on General of Brigade Pouget. Dated May 21, 1813, and signed by Clarke "Duc de Feltre" as Minister of War. A nice Napoleonic military document in fine condition. $355.00

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5. KARL DONNITZ (1891-1980)
World War Two German Admiral, originator of the dreaded U-boat "Wolfpacks," successor to Hitler in the final days of the war. Typed letter in German to Mr. Edmond Marino, dated January 3, 1960, along with the original envelope. The admiral conveys his best wishes for the New Year, and has signed at the bottom "Donitz." $260.00

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6. KARL DONNITZ (1891-1980)
World War Two German Admiral, originator of the dreaded U-boat "Wolfpacks," successor to Hitler in the final days of the war. Nice printed response sending thanks for birthday wishes, and apologizing for not being able to send a hand-written response. In the case of this particular note, Donitz adds a nice hand-written greeting and appends his bold signature in blue, "Donitz." $325.00

20. USS CONSTITUTION RENTAL RECEIPT FOR LAND OCCUPIED DURING ITS CONSTRUCTION
The U.S.S. Constitution is a wooden-hulled three masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy. Named by President George Washington after the Constitution of the United States of America, the frigate is the world's oldest floating commissioned naval vessel. Launched in 1797, the USS Constitution was one of six original frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794 and the third constructed out of the six.

The Constitution is most famous for her actions during the War of 1812 against Great Britain when she captured numerous merchant ships and defeated five British warships. It was after a battle with the HMS Guerriere, that the Constitution was nicknamed "Old Ironsides." The frigate's popularity inspired public outcry anytime the subject of scrapping came up, repeatedly saving it from being dismantled. Today, the Constitution serves as an historical symbol of the Navy's role in war and peace. The frigate is the oldest commissioned vessel afloat in the world.

This rare, original receipt is in excellent condition and dated August 27, 1798. It was issued to confirm the receipt of $66.66 for the rental of a piece of land occupied in building the frigate, Constitution. A partially printed document, issued in Boston, Commonwealth of Massachusetts. $16,000.00
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19. JOHN RODGERS (Jr.) (1812-1882)
Son of Commodore John Rodgers and Civil War naval officer. Captain of the monitor "Weehawken," Rodgers would distinguish himself in the attack on Fort Sumter in April 1863 and against the Confederate ironclad "Atlanta." He received the Thanks of Congress and a promotion to Commodore. He took command of the ship, Dictator, but ongoing design and construction problems kept him with that ship for the remainder of the war. Post war, Rodgers would command the Boston Naval Station, take command of the Asiatic Squadron, command Mar Island and eventually become the Superintendent of the United States Naval Observatory.

This document is written on the official stationary of the U.S. Navy Yard, Boston. Dated June 22, 1867, the letter requests a one week leave of absence for E.J. Brooks, 1st Assistant Engineer. It is approved and signed by Alex Henderson, chief engineer. The document has been signed "Granted, John Rodgers." $475.00